Te Kete Ipurangi Navigation:

Te Kete Ipurangi
Communities
Schools

Te Kete Ipurangi user options:


Ministry of Education.
Kaua e rangiruatia te hāpai o te hoe; e kore tō tātou waka e ū ki uta

Element 3 Aspect 1: Technology as an essential learning area

Teacher Education – Pre-service

Element 3

Aspect 1: technology as an essential learning area
Outlines the development of technology education in New Zealand, policy and practice.

Aspect Purpose
To support student teachers to appreciate the relationship between policy and classroom practice in technology education.

Key Words: Relationship, policy, classroom practice

Resources

Book Chapter

"Reviewing the field of technology education in New Zealand"

This is an up-to-date, concise article that outlines the key formative events and issues that have shaped the development of technology education in New Zealand. For newcomers to technology education, the article is easy to read and provides a helpful and relatively short introduction to the historical development of technology education in New Zealand.

The article is useful as part of an introduction to technology education and would help learners develop a deeper understanding of the evolution of technology education within New Zealand.

Reference
Jones, A. and Compton, V. (2009). "Reviewing the field of technology education in New Zealand". In A. Jones and M. de Vries (Eds.), International Handbook of Research and Development in Technology Education (pp. 93-104). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

Keywords: technology education

Reviewed by Mike Forret.

Book Chapter

Title: "Principles – Foundations of curriculum decision making"

Review Statement
The principles embody beliefs about what is important and desirable in school curriculum – nationally and locally.

The principles include:

  • high expectations
  • Treaty of Waitangi
  • cultural diversity
  • inclusion
  • learning to learn
  • community engagement
  • coherence
  • future focus.

The principles put students at the centre of teaching and learning, asserting that they should experience a curriculum that: engages and challenges them, is forward-looking and inclusive, and affirms New Zealand's unique identity.

As such, the principles identified the New Zealand Curriculum should underpin all school decision making particularly when planning, prioritising, and reviewing a school's curriculum.

Reference
Ministry of Education (2007). New Zealand Curriculum retrieved from http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/Curriculum-documents/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum/Principles.

Key phrases: principles: high expectations, Treaty of Waitangi, Cultural diversity, inclusion; learning to learn, community engagement, coherence, future focus

Book Chapter

Title: "Values – to be encouraged, modelled, and explored"

Review Statement
Values are deeply held beliefs about what is important or desirable.

Values identified in the New Zealand Curriculum are:

  • excellence
  • innovation
  • inquiry and curiosity
  • diversity
  • equity
  • community and participation
  • ecological sustainability
  • integrity
  • respect.

Every decision relating to curriculum, and every interaction that takes place in a school, reflects the values of individuals involved and the collective values of the institution.

Reference
Ministry of Education (2007). New Zealand Curriculum retrieved from http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/Curriculum-documents/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum/Values.

Key phrases: values, excellence, innovation, inquiry and curiosity, diversity, equity, community and participation, ecological sustainability, integrity, respect

Paper

Title: "Technology and Values: Initial discussion of the relationship"

Review Statement
This paper summarises key points from the values section of the New Zealand Curriculum and discusses how values education links with technology education.

Reference
"Technology and Values: Initial discussion of the relationship". Version 4, 2010. Written by Dr Vicki Compton under contract to the Ministry of Education to support Technology in The New Zealand Curriculum. 97-99. http://www.techlink.org.nz/curriculum-support/pdfs/tcsp-technology-and-values.pdf.

Key phrases: key competencies, thinking, using language, symbols, texts, managing self, relating to others, participating and contributing, technological literacy, empowerment for future, specific learning intentions, integrated

Book Chapter

Title: "Learning areas - Important for a broad, general education"

Review Statement
The New Zealand Curriculum specifies eight learning areas: English, the arts, health and physical education, learning languages, mathematics and statistics, science, social sciences, and technology. School curricula focussed on these areas enable students to receive a broad, general education from years 1-10 and lay the foundations for specialism in years 11-13.

While the learning areas are presented as distinct, this should not limit the ways in which schools structure the learning experiences they offer students. All learning should make use of the natural connections that exist between learning areas and that link learning areas to the values and key competencies.

Reference
Ministry of Education (2007). New Zealand Curriculum retrieved from http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum.

Key phrases: learning areas. broad; link, learning experiences

Prepared by Bruce Granshaw.

Book Chapter

Title: "Technology curriculum achievement objectives"

Review Statement
The New Zealand Curriculum specifies eight learning areas: English, the arts, health and physical education, learning languages, mathematics and statistics, science, social sciences, and technology.

School curricula focussed on these areas enable students to receive a broad, general education from years 1-10 and lay the foundations for specialism in years 11-13. While the learning areas are presented as distinct, this should not limit the ways in which schools structure the learning experiences they offer students. All learning should make use of the natural connections that exist between learning areas and that link learning areas to the values and key competencies.

Reference: Ministry of Education (2007). New Zealand Curriculum retrieved from http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum/Technology/Achievement-objectives.

Key phrases: learning areas, broad, link, learning experiences

Prepared by Bruce Granshaw.

Key competencies

Book Chapter

Title: :Key competencies - capabilities for living and lifelong learning"

Review Statement
The New Zealand Curriculum identifies five key competencies:

  • thinking
  • using language, symbols, and texts
  • managing self
  • relating to others
  • participating and contributing.

People use these key competencies to live, learn, work, and contribute as active members of their communities. These competencies draw on knowledge, attitudes, and values in ways that lead to action. They are not separate or stand-alone. They are the key to learning in every learning area.

Reference: Ministry of Education (2007). New Zealand Curriculum retrieved from http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/Curriculum-documents/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum/Key-competencies.

Key phrases: key competencies: thinking; using language, symbols, and texts; managing self; relating to others; participating and contributing

Resource

Title: "What could key competencies look like in practice?"

Review Statement: This resource explores: what key competencies could look like in leadership, teaching and learning. It presents a range of discussion tools and school stories.

Reference: Ministry of Education (2007). Te Kete Ipurangi retrieved from http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/Key-competencies.

Key phrases: key competencies, thinking, using language, symbols, texts, managing self, relating to others, participating and contributing, leadership teaching, learning

Paper

Title: "Technology and Key Competencies"

Review Statement
This paper provides a discussion on the relationship the key competencies identified in The New Zealand Curriculum (2007) and how they link with technology education in a mutually enhancing manner. The key competencies provide an overarching series of competencies for all schools to embed in their school curriculum. This paper presents the key competencies and discusses.

Reference
"Technology and Key Competencies: Initial discussion of the relationship". Version 4, 2010. Written by Dr Vicki Compton under contract to the Ministry of Education to support Technology in The New Zealand Curriculum. 100-101. http://www.techlink.org.nz/curriculum-support/tech-key/index.htm.

Key phrases: key competencies, thinking, using language, symbols, texts, managing self, relating to others, participating and contributing, technological literacy, empowerment for future, specific learning intentions, integrated

Return to top ^