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There are 140 results.

  • Question

    Can you recommend a pathway to training to be a qualified teacher of Food Technology? I am a primary Trained teacher with an Bachelor of Education. I have been teaching Home economics type technology in a full primary for years 6, 7 and 8 for about 5-6 years now. I have had no PD apart from some advice from other teachers over the years. I would love to take this further but have no idea where to go or how to go about it. Any information you can share would be much appreciated.

    Answer

    The Otago Polytechnic offers a Bachelor of Culinary Arts course. We understand that the course is available in block sessions and also some aspects are available by distance. It would also be important for you to have an assessment of prior learning as this can fast track the qualification. We suggest that you contact the Otago Polytechnic for further information. 

  • Question

    I have a student who is doing AS91621 (3.21 - implement complex procedures using textile materials). I am concerned that the design she has developed does not have complex procedures even though she has chosen a fabric that is difficult to handle and needs a high degree of skill to ensure a quality finish. The fabric is silk chiffon - she's buying plain white, painting it with silk paints using a gum and getting it sun ray pleated. The skirt is lined, long and full with paper bag top. She is also making a small lined velvet cape to go with it.

    Answer

    To be judged as implementing complex procedures using textile materials the skirt and/or the cape will need to include two or more of the complex procedures listed in EN3:

    • joining materials with different properties i.e. jacket shell and lining, sailcloth onto tape
    • changing the characteristics of the materials i.e. interfacing, interlining, boning
    • managing special fabrics i.e. fine knits, sheers, satins, ripstop nylon, canvas
    • managing the inclusion of structural or style features i.e. tucks, pockets, openings, closures, weather proof storage
    • cutting on the bias.

    While the skirt is being made through ‘managing a special fabric’ (silk chiffon) it would also need to include one other complex procedure. For example, using a lining material that has different properties from silk chiffon and joining this to the silk chiffon. Similarly the velvet cape would allow the student to demonstrate implementation of complex procedures through ‘managing a special fabric’ (velvet) if the lining was a material with different properties to velvet (joining materials with different properties).

  • Question

    Where do we find the architectural conventions/standards for drawing use (including material symbols)?

    Answer

    You will find useful material here.

    In addition the the NZ standards are available as PDF's  from the Standards New Zealand website here.

    This book 'Standard Technical Drawing Practice', 1981, published by Standards Association of New Zealand is still used as a reference by some DVC teachers. It is currently out of print however you may find there is a copy in your department.

  • Question

    I would like some clarification about the difference between the level 2 and 3 planning standards (AS91355 and AS91609). What is the difference between "selecting and using planning tools" and "undertaking project management"? When does using planning tools become project management?

    Answer

    The intention behind the level 2 planning standard AS91355: Select and use planning tools to manage the development of an outcome - was that the students will examine planning tools they are familiar with and some that the teacher may have suggested and use these to manage and review the progress of their project to completion. Whereas for the level 3 planning standard AS 91069: Undertake project management to support technological practice - the evidence should show that the student has carried out thorough research (both at the beginning and on-going in their project) to effectively match  planning tools to suit the project in hand (the physical and social environment). The choice should show that the student has considered in an on-going manner their own strengths in planning and effectively carrying out a project. For example they may need to select a method of communicating with stakeholders that is effective and efficient and if emails don't work arrange face to face interviews, focus groups, or phone calls at a convenient time. This could change throughout the project depending on the nature of the tasks and  the current situation with stakeholders, resource providers, and experts. Similarly if visual communication rather than extensive written documentation optimised their use of time then this would be reflected in the evidence. The term scheduling is used in the standard - this is defined as "the process of deciding how to commit resources between a variety of possible tasks".

    The selection of planning tools to manage the development of an outcome becomes project management to support technological practice when scheduling is obvious in the process of the project and the selection of planning tools is informed by on-going critical analysis of existing project management tools. The selection of planning tools is more reactive and dynamic in the second instance.

    The Indicators of Progression, Technological practice, Planning for Practice component levels 6-8 also provides information on this.

  • Question

    AS 91063 external, level1, Produce freehand sketches that communicate design ideas - I notice the key message for DVC states that other media is required to achieve with merit and excellence, including rendering. The standard and external markers schedules do not state this, so which is right?

    Answer

    The Key Messages are only a guide to what students could do to show details that visually communicate design features, including such things as form, shape function and aesthetics. Rendering is not a requirement for AS 91063 however when applied appropriately it can be used to enhance the communication of design ideas.

  • Question

    I am trying to allow individual choice at L2 in the Implement standard for Textiles but am having difficulty ensuring the outcome is within the definitions of special features .....if I allow an assymetrical hem and a difficult fabric (which is more an element at L3) do you think this meets that criteria of two special features?

    Answer

    An asymmetrical hem, as defined by AS91345 Explanatory Note 7 (EN7), is not a special feature which requires the application of advanced skills. EN7 states that: Special features are those that rely on the application of advanced skills.  These include but are not limited to: style features, such as set in sleeve, fly front, tailored collars and cuffs, welt pockets and/or decorative features such as pin tucking, embroidery, and shirring and/or structural features such as 3D felting and combining different fibres in felting and different materials eg nuno felting.

    An example of a special feature that requires the application of advanced skills is a ‘set in sleeve’ which requires the use of advanced skills such as gathering, fitting the sleeve to the garment and the person, and finishing the sleeve seam. A shaped hem does not require the application of advanced skills and is therefore more apt for assessment against level 1 AS91058 Implement basic procedures using textile materials to make a specified product.Working with a difficult fabric is not a ‘special feature’ in itself. While such fabrics may require the use of advanced skills to implement a special feature, the skills required to work such a fabric in themselves do not create a special feature as defined by EN 7.

  • Question

    Two of the Level 3 draft standards DVC 3.30 (AS91627); DVC 3.34 (AS91631)) talk about "4d". Is the 4th dimension "time"? Does this mean that animations could come into play?

    Answer

    A good question that many teachers have asked. 4D refers to the possibilities that students may wish to use sound or animation to explore or develop ideas either in graphics practice or visually presenting their ideas. 4D can enhance both the visual and sensory experience of the viewer.

  • Question

    AS91052: Demonstrate understanding of the ways a technological outcome, people, and social and physical environments interact requires students to "consider both influences and impacts". The Technology Online Glossary defines an Impact as "A significant or strong influence" and has no definition for Influence. I have read the explanatory paper for the Characteristics of Technlogical Outcomes which uses both Influence and Impact but does not make the difference clear. The sample assessments from TKI also use both terms but fail to make the differences clear. And there is not annotated student work available for this standard. Help, please!

    Answer

    AS91052: Demonstrate understanding of the ways a technological outcome, people, and social and physical environments interact requires students to "consider both influences and impacts". The Technology Online Glossary defines an Impact as "A significant or strong influence" and has no definition for Influence. I have read the explanatory paper for the Characteristics of Technological Outcomes which uses both Influence and Impact but does not make the difference clear. The sample assessments from TKI also use both terms but fail to make the differences clear. And there is not annotated student work available for this standard. Help, please!

    This question is a discussion on semantics because influences and impacts are often used interchangeably in day to day conversations so here are some definitions and examples that I hope will clarify for you the distinction. Following this up is a section on how it relates in a technological environment.
    Influence
    1. (noun)the capacity or power of persons or things to be a compelling force on or produce effects on things such as the actions, behaviour, opinions, of others: (From dictionary.reference.com/browse/influence)
    2. (noun)A power affecting a person, thing, or course of events, especially one that operates without any direct or apparent effort: (From www.answers.com/topic/influencing). Influence is often when something is altering your behaviour.
    Impact
    1. the striking of one thing against another; forceful contact; collision: The impact of the colliding cars broke the windshield.
    2. (influence); effect: the impact of Einstein on modern physics.
    3.the force exerted by a new idea, concept, technology, or ideology: the impact of the industrial revolution.

    In this way we describe an impact as a consequence of a defined action creating a consequential outcome or effect. Therefore it is the impact of the technological development or outcome ON society or the environment.
    For example consider the effect or impact of the discovery of penicillin on modern medicine, or the way in which force exerted by a new idea, concept, technology, or ideology has on society the impact of the mini skirt (see assessment resource1.9A Achievement Standard 91052, Demonstrate understanding of the ways a technological outcome, people, and social and physical environments interact: The Miniskirt) .In this way we are considering cause and effect when exploring impact of technology or outcomes on their social and physical environment. Effect being seen usually the result of some thing or event taking place or introduced.

    Impact of the technological outcome on the social, physical environment and as a result there are Influences of society (ways of thinking perception and values and beliefs) and the environment on the development of the outcome. Therefore it is an iterative interaction and relationship between the technological development and the social, physical environment and the people. So if you talk about the impact of technology on society and then relate the influences of society back to the future development and change of an outcome you will have a cycle that describes the impacts on and the influences of.. which informs future development and thinking.

  • Question

    Could I please have some information and a definition of key attributes?

    Answer

    Attributes describe the physical and functional nature of a technological outcome. 'Key' attributes are those which are considered 'important' when describing a technological outcome. For example, 'key' attributes for a potato peeler may refer to the peeler being small enough to be comfortably held in your hand and/or able to peel potatoes. An attribute that is not considered 'key' for a potato peeler however could be colourful.

    When attributes become more specified they are call 'specifications'. Specifications define the requirements of the physical and functional nature of the outcome in a way that is measurable. For example, specifications for a potato peeler would state the precise measurement of the length, width and depth (ie overall shape (profile) of the peeler), define the thickness of the peel that is to be removed by the peeler, state the material(s) it will be made out of etc.

  • Question

    What are the fundamental differences between the following standards at level 1 - AS91082 (1.60): Implement basic procedures to process a specified product and AS91083 (1.61) : Demonstrate understanding of basic concepts used in processing ?

    Answer

    AS1.60 is focused on assessing a student’s competency in ‘using’ basic procedures (see EN5 for explanation) to implement a processing operation that enables a specified product to be produced.

    EN1.61 on the other hand assesses student understandings of the basic concepts that enable processing to occur.

    Examples of assessment resources for each of these standards can be found at: http://ncea.tki.org.nz/Resources-for-aligned-standards/Technology/Level-1-Technology.

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