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There are 2 results for 'transformation'.

  • Question

    I would like clarification around the definitions of formulation,manipulation ,and transformation in textiles materials. At level 4 in the component Technological products it states: Provide students with the opportunity to discuss what is meant by materials being formed, manipulated and transformed. Forming refers to bringing two or more materials together to formulate a new material resulting in a different overall composition and structure to that of the original materials. This results in different performance properties. For example: mixing flour, water and salt to make dough; mixing wood fibres, resin and wax to make MDF; glass fibre and a polymer resin combined to form fiberglass or fibre reinforced polymer (FRP). Manipulating materials refers to ‘working’ existing materials in ways that do not change their properties as their composition and structure is not altered. For example: cutting; molding; bending; jointing; gluing; painting. Transforming refers to changing the structure of an existing material to change some of its properties, but in terms of its composition, it remains the same material. For example: felting; beating an egg white; steaming timber to soften its fibres and allow it to be manipulated (bent). I am working in practice with students on a wearable art project. Is melting layers of plastic together manipulating or transforming? Is stretch corduroy a good example of forming? Is the new yarn and fabric WoJo developed by the Formary an example of forming a new material? See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlfI_IdHF0Q Is it likely that students could be forming new textile materials in technological practice?

    Answer

    Is melting layers of plastic together manipulating or transforming?

    Joining plastic using heat is manipulation - a thicker piece of plastic is created but there are no change in properties as the structure and composition stays the same –it is still plastic just thicker.

    Is stretch corduroy a good example of forming?

    No this is an example of manipulation. The two base materials-cotton and spandex are spun together and then woven into the corduroy fabric. The composition (read chemical ) and the structure of the spandex and cotton is not changed in this process therefore it is not an example of forming a new material.

    Is the new yarn and fabric WoJo® developed by the Formary an example of forming a new material? See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlfI_IdHF0Q

    WoJo® fabric is created by blending wool and jute fibre from coffee sacks. The composition (read chemical) and the structure of the wool and jute is not changed in this process therefore it is not an example of forming a new material. This is an example of manipulation.

    Is it likely that students could be forming new textile materials in technological practice

    It would be unusual for students to be forming new textile materials in the classroom, as this requires access to industrial equipment and facilities. Polyester, Dacron and Terylene are examples of a material that are formed by combining ethylene glycol and terephthalic acid to form polyethylene terephthalate.

  • Question

    I have been asked by another teacher to clarify ways in which fabrics/textiles can be used as examples of Technological Systems. Can the development of a patchwork quilt be considered a system – with inputs of fabric pieces, wadding and backing transformed into the final patchwork quilt design?

    Answer

    A technological system within the Technology learning area is generally defined as a system that works independently or automatically of human input. After the system has been started or switched on it works automatically. A clock on the wall is a good example of a technological system. It works independently of human input once the batteries are put in and it is switched on. Humans are not required to turn the actual handles of the clock, it’s doing the turning of the hands of the clock by itself. Other examples commonly used are toasters, stoves, hot water systems, and electronic systems generally.

    The development of the patchwork quilt would not be considered a system. However, technological systems can be embedded in textile products.

    Here is an example of a quilt that includes a lighting system (a technological system):

    Here is an example of a simple interactive quilt with multiple sensors:

    Some textile teachers will also support students to add electronic lighting systems to wearable art products.

    Here is an example of a dress that has a technological system embedded in it that allows the butterflies to fly off the dress:

    There is also mention of embedding circuits in textiles in this video clip:

    Technological systems such as body sensors may also be added to clothing. This is very prevalent with military clothing. See The Rise of Smart Clothing and Body Sensors for Military Use.

    There are various courses available for textiles teachers to learn about embedding soft circuits in textiles such as Soft Circuits and Sensors.

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